A.F. Product Gallery: Track by Year: 1946

Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:690
Road Name:Track Terminal
Year Introduced:1946
The #690 Track Terminal was produced from 1946 through 1956, in four variations. The first two variations are shown in the main photo. Both have Fahnstock clips, but one has a black fiber board base while the second has a brown fiber board base. The third variation is similar to the one on the left with Fahnstock clips, however it has "TRACK TERMINAL" stamped on the base. The last variation used Zip clips instead of the Fahnstock ones. The 1957-through-1959 version was cataloged as #26690 and came in a tan envelope. Photo #2 shows the original packaging.
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:695
Road Name:Automatic Track Trip / Reverse Loop Relay
Year Introduced:1946
#695 is one of the handful of A.C. Gilbert products that were re-used throughout the years.

The #695 Track Trip (illustration shown in main image) was produced in 1946 only and has just one variation and is extremely rare.

The #695 Reverse Loop Relay (see Photo #2) was produced in 1955 and 1956 in two variations. The first variation has two #707 and one #690 Track Terminal along with two fiber insulating pins. The second variation has three #707 Track Terminals and no insulating pins.
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:700 & 702
Road Name:Straight & Curved Track
Year Introduced:1946
The 10" #700 Straight and #702 Curved Track products are shown with their 1946 American Flyer track boxes. These were produced from 1946 to 1956. The numbers were changed to the new computerized 5-digit number 26700 for straight and 26720 for curved track from 1957 through 1964. The dating of the 700 and 702 track sections to 1946 is verified by noting that the side of the rails are blackened which Gilbert only did in 1946. Photo #2 shows the #700 from above (it also includes a section of HO-scale #380 for comparison).
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:705
Road Name:Remote Uncoupler
Year Introduced:1946
The #705 was produced in 1946 and 1947. It came in a tan heavy cardboard box, and with a control button. It has only one variation. It has a black Bakelite housing with an integral square box which is permanently mounted to a 10" section of track with blackened rails that was typical of 1946 and some early 1947 track.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:707
Road Name:Track Terminal
Year Introduced:1946
The #707 Track Terminal that was produced from 1946 through 1959, in two variations. The variation with the Fahnstock clip is shown in the photo. The second variation has a Zip clip. This terminal makes contact with only one rail (the #690 makes contact with both rails). The #707 is used for many accessories, such as the Talking Station, to re-apply power to the isolated track section after the accessory has completed it function.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:710
Road Name:Steam Whistle Control
Year Introduced:1946
Both the Automatic Track Section and the Steam Whistle Control had the number "710" assigned to them by Gilbert. The 710 Automatic Track Section was produced in 1946-47 and was used on action cars such as the 715 Auto Unloader Car, 716 Coal Dump Car, and the 717 Log Unloader Car. All of these cars had an inside rail pick-up (see second photo of the 1946 Coal Dump car) to activate a solenoid on each of these cars to create the action needed for the car.

The 710 Steam Whistle Control was produced in 1955-56 and Gilbert's answer to putting a whistle into their locomotives. Gilbert's first attempt at a whistle in a locomotive was in 1949 with the 314AW, which had to be pulled from the market in 1950 because a patent infringement law suit by Lionel. This unit is part of the 1955 5545W New Yard King set that is highly desirable as it is headed by a 346 0-8-0 switcher and was the only 0-8-0 that was equipped with a whistle.
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:720
Road Name:Remote Control Switch
Year Introduced:1946
The #720 Remote Control Switches were produced from 1946 until 1949, in only one variation. The major difference between the #720 and the #720A is the shape of the black Bakelite base. The #720 has two opening in the base. A small opening is located between the curved and straight track. A large opening is located between the curved track and the switch motor housing. The #720 typically came in a heavy tan cardboard box with a red & white label on the end as shown in the photo.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:720A
Road Name:Remote Control Switch
Year Introduced:1946
The #720A Remote Control Switches were produced from 1946 through 1956 as a replacement for the #720. The major difference between the #720 and the #720A is the shape of the Bakelite base, which is why the "A" suffix was added to the catalog number. The #720A has rectangular shape free of any cutouts. A common mistake by many is that they identify #720A as #720. The #720A has three variations, two of which are shown in the photo. The left switch show in the photo is one of the variations that were produced in 1954, which has colored dots next to the binding post. A second variation produced in 1951 has colored disks around the binding post as shown on the right switch. The third variation, not shown, has Fahnstock Clips and colored disk instead of binding post with colored disks. This variation was most likely produced after 1954. The 720A first came in a yellow & blue lightweight cardboard box while later models produced around 1956 came in red & white boxes. In 1957, Gilbert converted to a new 5-digit catalog numbering system for all of the products. The #720A became #26742 in 1957-58 which was packaged in a red & white box. The #26742 has two variations one has binding post while the second has Fahnstock Clips. In 1958 the base of the Remote Control Switches was changed from Bakelite to black plastic and the new units were given the new number #26760 which remained until 1964. Without the original box, it is nearly impossible to distinguish #720A from either #26742 or #26780 except the #26780 has a plastic base.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:722
Road Name:Manual Switch
Year Introduced:1946
The Manual Switch was produced from 1946 through 1951, and replaced in 1952 by the 722A with the full base style. Usually sold in pairs, right and left. The turnout position indicators (red/green) were made of plastic. These easily broke off, so the photos show what it looks like. Photos #2 and #3 show the side view of the two turnout positions. There is a hole in the base (on the left side) that was made by a previous owner, and was not part of a new #722.
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
model owned by David Dewey
photo © David Dewey
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:725
Road Name:90-degree Crossing
Year Introduced:1946
The #725 was produced from 1946 through 1956, in two variations. The rarest variation, which was produced in 1946 (close-up shown in Photo #3, the underside is shown in Photo #4), has brass strips in the wheel channels of the crossover plate; a feature that was discontinued in 1947. The brass strips were originally thought to correct loss of tender wheel contact while crossing the diamond however, it did not work well after the contacts got dirty. The common variation, shown in the main photo, was made from 1947 through 1956. In addition, the 1946 model has blackened rails that did not appear on a #725 after 1946 (this can be seen in Photo #3). From 1957 through 1964, A.C. Gilbert sold the 90 Degree Crossing as #26745. However, the only way to tell a #725 from a #26745 was from the original box. The 1946 through 1956 crossings came in boxes marked "725" while the later units came in boxes marked "26745". There is one difference in the crossing that the Greenberg and Doyle books have failed to mention, and that is that some of the early units have wires that connect the track sections while other have metal strips (see the back view in Photo #2).
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
Photo #4
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:730
Road Name:Bumpers
Year Introduced:1946
The #730 Bumper was produced from 1946 through 1956 and has three variations. The first variation (not shown) is bluish-green in color. The second and third are shown in the photo. The most common is made of green plastic while the rarest made in 1951 only was made of red plastic. Note to collectors: reproductions of the red plastic model have been made. The one characteristic to identify a real red variation from a reproduction is that the real model has the wording "American Flyer by Gilbert Co New Haven Conn U.S.A." embossed on the rear like all of the green variations (see Photo #2).
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler

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