A.F. Product Gallery: 1960 Gondolas

Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24120
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Texas & Pacific
Road Number:24120
Year Introduced:1960
The uncataloged #24120, with very large letters, was offered in 1960 only, in three variations. The most common, shown in the photo, has a dark green plastic body with Pike-Master trucks and couplers. The second and third variations are very rare and are thought to be pre-production samples. The second variation is painted red over a cream plastic body. The third variation is painted yellow over a red-painted cream plastic body and this variation has black lettering.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24125
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Bethlehem Steel
Road Number:24125
Year Introduced:1960
The #24125 gondola was introduced in 1960 and was offered through 1966. According to Greenberg, five variations of the #24125 gondola made from 1960 to 1964. Ted has documentation that indicates the cars were made through 1966. The most common variations consist of three made in 1961 through 1966, all of which have Pike-Master couplers and trucks. All three have light gray plastic bodies. One variation has maroon, orange, or red lettering. The second has red lettering that starts in the far left panel. The third light gray plastic gondola with red lettering that is double stamped on one side. The remaining two variations all are much more rare with a value that is 8 to 10 times more than the three common variations. Both variations come with four 7-5/8"-long metal rail load supported by two metal brackets. The first, which was produced in 1961 as shown in the foreground of the photo, has Pike-Master couplers and trucks, which is painted gray over a medium gray body. The second made in 1960 is painted gray over a black plastic body and has sintered-iron trucks with operating knuckle couplers. With this car the rail load is often lost and individuals have been know to replace the rail load with non-original rails by using rails from straight track. In Photo #2, you will note that the rails used in track sections have two crimps near the end of the rail section that are used to hold the connecting pin in place. The original rails as produced at the Gilbert factory do not have the two crimps in the rails. The 1960 cars that were packaged for separate sale came in Kleer-Pak cartons all of which were painted gray with knuckle couplers.
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler

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