A.F. Product Gallery: Gondolas

Manufacturer:American Flyer
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Boston & Maine
Road Number:9680
Holt repainted this model based on the prototype B&M car (there were about 300 of these 43-foot long cars re-built in their shops in 1957 from cars originally constructed during WWII, and lasted into the 1960s). Holt used dry transfers, decals, and a flat clear lacquer for a slightly weathered look.
Photo
model owned by Holt Apgar
photo © Holt Apgar
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Buffalo Hunt
Year Introduced:1963
The Buffalo Hunt gondola and the Freight Ahead caboose are the only two cars produced by Gilbert that did not have a catalog number. The Buffalo Hunt gondola was produced in 1963 only in only one variation. This unusual gondola was not sold separately and was offered only as part of the 1963 #20800 Game Train set.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Erie Railroad
Road Number:14250
This stock AF repainted model represents one of a 1929-30 class of 48' Greenville & Bethlehem steel gondolas made for the Erie RR. More than 330 were still on the rails in the late 1950s, and some were still running for the merged E-L in the 1970s, with their original Erie markings. Holt started with an AF black Southern RR gondola, and repainted it with Testors flat black enamel, applied an old set of CDS dry transfers for Erie gondolas, and finished it with flat, clear lacquer.
Photo
model owned by Holt Apgar
photo © Holt Apgar
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Maine Central (MEC)
A stock AF gondola that has been repainted by Bob Comstock and lettered for the Maine Central.
Photo
model owned by Holt Apgar
photo © Holt Apgar
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:New York New Haven & Hartford
Road Number:61072
A stock AF gondola which has been repainted and lettered for the NH in the early 1990s by Bob Comstock. These prototype cars were rebuilt and repainted in 1955 by IRCC, and leased back to the NH.
Photo
model owned by Holt Apgar
photo © Holt Apgar
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Pennsylvania Railroad
A.F. converted to scale using wooden floor components, Permabilt ladders, Stewart and Liberty brake components, Rex trucks.
Photo
model owned by Bob Werre
photo © Bob Werre
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Pittsburgh & Lake Erie
Road Number:10193
This model is a repainted AF gondola (to model a 55' P&LE gon in its mid-1950s appearance). The model was finished with Campbell Road "S" scale dry transfers, and a flat clear lacquer.
Photo
model owned by Holt Apgar
photo © Holt Apgar
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:631
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Texas & Pacific
Road Number:631
Year Introduced:1946
The #631 gondola was produced from 1946 through 1953 and has six unpainted green variations and three green or red painted variations. There are two 1946 variations with thin shank link couplers both are dark green one has silver letter while the other has white lettering. The one 1947 variation has thick shank link couplers with a dark green body. The two 1948 variations have link couplers with brass weighted link couplers. One of the 1948 variations is dark green and the other is a very rare gray model (see Photo #3). The last of the unpainted variations was produced from 1949 through 1952 that has a dark green body and link couplers with black link coupler weights. Two of the painted variations were produced from 1949 through 1952 that are painted dark green. One is painted dark green over a green body while the second is painted dark green over a red body. The last painted variation produced in 1952, shown in the main photo, is painted red over a cream plastic body.
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:804
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Norfolk & Western
Road Number:804
Year Introduced:1956
During the Gilbert days of S-gauge trains, there was a basic standard to their numbering system. In 1956-57, Gilbert produced seven freight cars that broke from that standard. Prior to this time, all non-operating cars carried a 900 series catalog number. These seven cars were part of three lower priced catalog sets in 1956-57 and were part of a few uncataloged sets. The 800 series cars were not sold separately.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:805
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Pennsylvania Railroad
Road Number:805
Year Introduced:1956
During the Gilbert days of S-gauge trains, there was a basic standard to their numbering system. In 1956-57, Gilbert produced seven freight cars that broke from that standard. Prior to this time, all non-operating cars carried a 900 series catalog number. These seven cars were part of three lower priced catalog sets in 1956-57 and were part of a few uncataloged sets. The 800 series cars were not sold separately. There are two variations: one is Tuscan plastic while the other is painted Tuscan. The second photo is by Holt Apgar, showing the original AF car in the background, and a repainted version which Holt lettered for the PRR G29 class and an appropriate road #359420 (mid-1950s tuscan red appearance).
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:911
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Chesapeake & Ohio
Road Number:911
Year Introduced:1955
The #911 gondola was produced from 1955 through 1957 and has four variations. The first variation is painted black over either a black or a red plastic body. The word "PROGRESS" is in large letters (29/32" long). The second variation has a black painted body however, the word "PROGRESS" is in small letters (13/16" long). The third variation, shown in the photo, has a black plastic body with large "PROGRESS" lettering. The last variation, made in 1955, is thought to have come in the #5520 set. The car is painted black over a black plastic body it has large lettering and brown pipes. Photo #2 is one of the model that Bill Winans modified for his layout.
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:916
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Delaware & Hudson
Road Number:916
Year Introduced:1956
The #916 gondola was offered in 1956 and 1957 and has two variations. One variation has capacity markings that read: "LT.WT. 52900" and "CU FT4316". The second variation has capacity markings as follows: "LT.WT. 52300" and "CU FT 4318". Photo #2 shows the same model in the background, with the foreground model being the one that Holt modified to match the prototype for these D&H cars in the mid-1950s. Hold used decals by Highball Graphics and Microscale, as well as dry-transfer numbers by Model Graphics. Flat clear lacquer sealed everything and provided a slightly weathered appearance. The D&H used road numbers #15900 through 15914, and #15950 through 15969 for its 35 gondolas modified for cement canister duty.
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:920
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Southern
Road Number:920
Year Introduced:1953
The #920 gondola was sold from 1953 through 1956 and has three variations. The first variation has an unpainted black plastic body, as shown in the photo. The second variation is painted black over either a black or a red plastic body. The third variation is also painted black except it is painted over a green plastic body.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:931
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Texas & Pacific
Road Number:931
Year Introduced:1952
The main photo shows three of the five variations of the #931 gondola. The one in the front is the early 1952 version with riveted knuckle couplers, which is the rarest. The middle #931 is a later 1952 version that was painted dark green over a black shell, and used wide letter spacing as did the early variation. The model in the rear of the photo is the more common variation produced between 1953 and 1955. It is lettered using the same method, but it has narrower letter spacing. Photo #2 shows the additional subtle differences between early and late variations. First, above the couplers, the 1952 version had square body ends to clear the coupler (which was common on all 1946-52 gondolas produced by Gilbert), while the 1953-55 version has slanted body ends. A close examination of this photo reveals the riveted coupler which can be seen on the early-1952 car on the right and the later crimped coupler can be seen on the left. Photo #3 shows the underside of the early-1952 model with riveted couplers and a later model with crimped couplers.
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:941
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:St. Louis-San Francisco (SLSF)
Road Number:941
Year Introduced:1953
The #941 was produced from 1953 through 1956 and has five variations. The first has a flat finish that is painted over a black body with Type 7 trucks. The second has a gloss tuscan finish that is painted over a black body. The third is painted tuscan over a white body with light blue lettering. The fourth is painted tuscan over a black plastic body with gray or silver-gray lettering. The last variation, shown in the photo, is painted over either a white or a clear plastic body and has white lettering.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24109
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Chesapeake & Ohio
Road Number:24109
Year Introduced:1957
Greenberg as well as others such as Doyle's book on American Flyer all state that the #24109 was a 1957 item. Although the 1957 AF catalog listed the C&O Gondola as #24109, the car was not produced in 1957 with that number on the car. In fact if you bought a C&O Gondola in 1957 what you would receive would be a #911 C&O Gondola in a #24108 red & white box. In 1957 Gilbert began using their new 5-digit numbering system that they assigned three numbers to each item for accounting purposes. For the C&O Gondola, the three numbers were 24107, 24108 and 24109 depending on how it was to be sold/packaged. Starting in 1958 the C&O Gondola first appeared with "24109" on the car that came in red & white box with "24109 C&O Gondola" printed on the end flaps. Of the five variations, the first variation made in 1958, shown in the photo, has yellow lettering and silver plastic pipes. The second made in 1959 and 1960 has yellow lettering and silver cardboard pipes. The third variation has yellow lettering and brown plastic pipes. The fourth has yellow lettering with orange cardboard pipes. The fifth variation has a black painted body, silver lettering and silver plastic pipes.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24110
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Pennsylvania Railroad
Road Number:24110
Year Introduced:1959
This uncataloged gondola came in two variations; one variation is unpainted Tuscan plastic, while the second is Tuscan-painted over a black plastic shell.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24120
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Texas & Pacific
Road Number:24120
Year Introduced:1960
The uncataloged #24120, with very large letters, was offered in 1960 only, in three variations. The most common, shown in the photo, has a dark green plastic body with Pike-Master trucks and couplers. The second and third variations are very rare and are thought to be pre-production samples. The second variation is painted red over a cream plastic body. The third variation is painted yellow over a red-painted cream plastic body and this variation has black lettering.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24124
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Boston & Maine
Road Number:24124
Year Introduced:1963
These models were produced in 1963 and 1964 and had 3 variations. In the photo are two of the variations. The rear unit is the more common unpainted blue-green model. The unit in the foreground has a black shell, which is painted dark blue and is the rarest of the three variations. The third variation is also painted dark blue, but it has painted ladders.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24125
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Bethlehem Steel
Road Number:24125
Year Introduced:1960
The #24125 gondola was introduced in 1960 and was offered through 1966. According to Greenberg, five variations of the #24125 gondola made from 1960 to 1964. Ted has documentation that indicates the cars were made through 1966. The most common variations consist of three made in 1961 through 1966, all of which have Pike-Master couplers and trucks. All three have light gray plastic bodies. One variation has maroon, orange, or red lettering. The second has red lettering that starts in the far left panel. The third light gray plastic gondola with red lettering that is double stamped on one side. The remaining two variations all are much more rare with a value that is 8 to 10 times more than the three common variations. Both variations come with four 7-5/8"-long metal rail load supported by two metal brackets. The first, which was produced in 1961 as shown in the foreground of the photo, has Pike-Master couplers and trucks, which is painted gray over a medium gray body. The second made in 1960 is painted gray over a black plastic body and has sintered-iron trucks with operating knuckle couplers. With this car the rail load is often lost and individuals have been know to replace the rail load with non-original rails by using rails from straight track. In Photo #2, you will note that the rails used in track sections have two crimps near the end of the rail section that are used to hold the connecting pin in place. The original rails as produced at the Gilbert factory do not have the two crimps in the rails. The 1960 cars that were packaged for separate sale came in Kleer-Pak cartons all of which were painted gray with knuckle couplers.
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24126
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:St. Louis-San Francisco (SLSF)
Road Number:24126
Year Introduced:1961
The #24126 gondola was produced in 1961 that has two variations. The more common variation, shown in the background of the main photo, has a Tuscan plastic body. The much more rare variation is painted Tuscan over a Tuscan plastic shell, shown in the foreground, that is a bit lighter in color. The #24126 gondola, when sold as part of a set, came in a set box that contained a cutout in the insert to hold the car in place. The #24126 that was sold separately typically came in a red & white Pike-Master style box. The plastic variation, for what ever reason, came in a plain tan box with the number stamped on one end (see Photo #3).
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24127
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Monon
Road Number:24127
Year Introduced:1961
The #24127 gondola was produced from 1961 through 1965 and has two variations. The first variation which is not very common has sintered-iron trucks and knuckle couplers. This variation may have been an early 1961 model as Gilbert may have been attempting to use old stock of sintered-iron trucks and couplers since 1961 was the first year of the new Pike-Master line. The second variation, shown in the photo, is the most common that has as Pike-Master trucks and couplers.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:C2009
Category:Gondolas
Road Name:Texas & Pacific
Road Number:C-2009
Year Introduced:1962
1961-62 Gilbert once again broke from their standard where all items carried a 5-digit catalog number. They produced three engines and three cars, many of which were uncataloged. The light green version in the foreground is common, but the dark green, plastic, model is rare. A third variation exists which is painted dark green over a black shell.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler

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