A.F. Product Gallery: Cabooses

Manufacturer:American Flyer
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:Freight Ahead
Year Introduced:1963
The 1963 Freight Ahead caboose has two variations. One variation utilizes a Type B frame while the second variation utilizes a Type D frame. The Buffalo Hunt Gondola and the Freight Ahead caboose are the only two cars produced by Gilbert that did not have a catalog number. This unusual caboose was not sold separately and was offered only as part of the 1963 #20800 Game Train set.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:Houston & Galveston Coast (H&GC)
Formerly a Reading caboose, American Flyer converted to scale.
Photo
model owned by Jack Troxell
photo © Bob Werre
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:484
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:484
A pre-war caboose of all-metal construction. This is an S-scale model on O-gauge wheels.
Photo
Video
model owned by Edwin Kirstatter
photo © Edwin Kirstatter
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:630
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:Reading (RDG)
Road Number:630
Year Introduced:1946
The #630 was produced from 1946 until 1953 in 26 variations. Many of the variations have to do with the style of lettering and window coverings. There are, however, four major variation groupings. The first variation grouping has seven variations, which were produced in 1946. They carried the "READING" name, and the the frame was either red or black plastic. Due to material shortages, early 1946 cabooses that were part of lower priced sets, came without a light and had silver lettering. Later in 1946, both the red and black frame models had lights and silver lettering and finally the lettering was changed from silver to white. The main photo shows six of the seven variations. In the front row the cabooses are, unlighted silver lettering, lighted silver lettering, and lighted white lettering. In the back the cabooses are unlighted silver, lighted silver, and lighted white lettering. Photo #2 shows the underside of those same models. The second major variation grouping has nine variations with the "READING" name. These were produced in 1947, 1948, and 1950. All of these cabooses have a diecast metal frame to eliminate the wrapping that occurred with all of the 1946 plastic frame cabooses. The front row of Photo #3 shows examples of those models. In 1949, Gilbert created the third major variation again based upon the frame type. In 1949, 1951, and 1952 the "READING" cabooses all had sheet metal frames to reduce cost and weight of the cabooses. This grouping has three variations. Two of the variations within the group have red plastic bodies, while the third has a red painted body. Shown in the back row of Photo #3 are a red plastic model on the left and a red painted model on the right. The last major grouping produced in 1952 and 1953 has seven variations. In that grouping, all of the frames are sheet metal and none of the cabooses carried the "READING" name. In 1952 the one variation carried the "AMERICAN FLYER" name while in 1953 the six variations all carried the "AMERICAN FLYER LINES" name as can be seen in Photo #4.
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
Photo #4
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:638
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer
Road Number:638
Year Introduced:1949
The #638 was produced from 1949 through 1952 in five red plastic and five red painted variations with the road name "AMERICAN FLYER". In 1953, the #638 was produced with the road name "AMERICAN FLYER LINES" in four variations. In the front row of the photo, the #638 marked AF is an example of the red plastic model from 1949-52. The AF caboose on the left in the back row is a painted variation produced in 1949-52. The caboose on the right in the back row is a red painted AFL caboose produced in 1953. Of the 14 variation, most of the differences in variations have to do with lettering style and body types.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:806
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:806
Year Introduced:1956
During the Gilbert days of S-gauge trains, there was a basic standard to their numbering system. In 1956-57, Gilbert produced seven freight cars that broke from that standard. Prior to this time, all non-operating cars carried a 900 series catalog number. These seven cars were part of three lower priced catalog sets in 1956-57 and were part of a few uncataloged sets. The 800 series cars were not sold separately. This model has two variations, where one has 1/8" lettering while the second has 5/32" lettering.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:930
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer
Road Number:930
Year Introduced:1952
The main photo shows three variations of the 1952 #930 American Flyer (not "American Flyer Lines") illuminated cabooses with knuckle couplers. All #930 cabooses, except for one of the two 1952 models, are tuscan. The second unique thing about these is that they are 1952 models with knuckle couplers. Photo #2 shows the underside of the 1952 American Flyer cabooses (the bottom one is the same as the foreground in the main photo, and the middle one is the same as the middle one in the main photo). Note the bottom red unit has riveted couplers, which is an example of an early 1952 model. The riveted style knuckle coupler on early 1952 models can also come in tuscan. These were one of only eight cars produced in 1952 with knuckle couplers. The tuscan painted #930 AMERICAN FLYER LINES caboose was produced in from 1953 through 1957 in six variations, which are in addition to the four variations marked "AMERICAN FLYER". The first five variations were produced between 1953 and 1956. The first variation is painted tuscan over a black Type I body, the second variation is painted over a red Type I body, and the third is painted over either a red, gray, or white Type II body. The fourth variation is painted over a Type II black body. The fifth is painted over a Type IIA black body. The sixth and last variation, shown Photo #3, is painted over a black Type III sheet metal snap-in frame in which the lamp is riveted to the chassis. The sticker on the bottom of the base reads: "TO CHANGE LAMP REMOVE / SCREW FROM END OF BODY". This variation was produced in 1957 only and came in a red and white box marked "24608" as that was the new 5-digit catalog issued to the #930 for 1957.

Photo #4 shows a reworked model by Holt. He turned the #930 into an N5b Pennsylvania cabin car. Fitting the I-beam collision posts into the end braces and changing the side windows were the most difficult tasks. End windows were cut first; inner side windows were blocked, and outer side windows were extended upward, and filled at the base. Plastic I-beam collision posts were trimmed and carefully fitted into the tuscan painted end braces. Flat black Testors enamel was brushed onto the roof. The class N5b cabin decals are from Microscale; they are HO-scale, but correct for class N5b. Flexible plastic glazing and flat clear lacquer completed the project. The Pennsy Altoona shops built most of the PRR cabin cars over the years from their own plans. After 900 steel N5 cabooses were built from 1914 onward, this N5b class of 200 (body length 30'7.5") was built in 1941 (#s 477620 - 477819).
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
Photo #4
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:934
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:934
Year Introduced:1954
This was an uncataloged item. Since the 934 was assigned to a floodlight series of cars in 1953, Ted believes a mistake was made when assigning a number to the caboose as two different items were not to carry the same catalog number. The 934 caboose is identical to the 938 caboose that was also introduced in 1954, however the 938 was a bobtail style caboose whereas the 934 has a coupler on both ends.
Photo #2 is of a #934 that Holt repainted based on the 1960s paint scheme for the Lehigh Valley, which includes the yellow handrails and ladders, yellow rectangular safety slogans, the peaked narrow rain gutters above the paired side windows, and the narrow rectangular windows on the right side of both ends of the main cabin. HO-scale Microscale decals provided the numbers and lettering. Flexible acrylic sheet was used for the glazing, and a section of brass tube was used for the stack-top cross-piece. Flat clear lacquer sealed the decals, car sides, and the thinned brown enamel roof weathering. The LV's railroad shops built 140 Northeastern type cabeese from Bethlehem Steel kits based on the original USRA design (~1928); phase I production was from 1937 through 1944 at the Sayre shops. This model represents a late Phase-I built in 1944.
Photo #3: Holt extensively reworked another #934 caboose into a New Haven NE6 in McGinnis 1955-58 colors. He cut the end windows, sealed the outer side windows, and re-cut the inner side windows upward and filled the originals. He used decals by Accu-cals and Microscale. He hand-brushed Testors Model Master flat enamel pained, and sealed the model with flat clear lacquer. He then applied the side windows' glazing, and cut a brass tube for smokestack crosspiece. This models an ICC NE6 caboose (#C635-C709) built in 1947-48; McGinnis scheme applied in 1955-58 interval by the Readville Shop of the NH RR.
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:935
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:935
Year Introduced:1957
This model was introduced in 1957 in only one variation. In the 1957 catalog on page 18, the #935 is listed as #24619 however, #935 was shown on the side of the car. Secondly, the catalog illustration also shows the lettering and grab irons on the car in white, while in fact #935 has yellow lettering and grab irons. The #935 was the first post-war caboose not to have either white or silver lettering.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:938
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:Central Railroad of New Jersey
Road Number:91524
Year Introduced:1954
The #938 was produced in 1954 and 1955 in three variations. The first variation, shown in the main photo, is painted red over a Type I or a Type II black plastic body that is a bobtail style caboose (no rear coupler) with Type 8 trucks. The second with a straight-sided "M" is painted red over a Type I black plastic body with Type 8A. The third variation is painted red over either a black or a white Type II body that is mounted on Type 7 trucks.
Photo #2 shows Holt's hand-painted model using Testors paint. He added the smokestack cross piece and applied window glazing. Both dry-transfers and wet decals were used. It is modeled after a prototype of the early 1960s.
Photo #3 shows a #938 that Holt substantially repainted and decorated for the Boston & Maine. The C92 model closely matches one of ten (C90 - C99) northeastern style cabooses purchased by the B&M in 1962 from original owner L≠ they were built by Magor Car Co. in 1931, as wood cabins with steel underframes. Holt applied two coats of Testors flat enamels by hand. Lettering and logos were dry transfers and Microscale decals, sealed with flat clear lacquer. End brass parts and brake wheels were painted white as per the prototype. The stack top crosspiece was cut from brass tube stock. Windows were glazed. These ten C90s were the only wood-framed, 4 windows per side, cabooses on the B&M to wear the late-1950s blue, black, and white McGinnis era paint scheme.
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:977
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:977
Year Introduced:1955
The #977 action cabooses were produced from 1955 through 1957 in 8 variations. The 1955 variation, shown on the left in the photo, has a metal man and accounts for four of the variations. These variations are as a result of the man having or not having facial features, the patent number (2,861,391) being printed or not printed on the bottom of the frame and the caboose having either Type 6 or 7 trucks. The #977 action cabooses produced in 1956 and 1957, shown on the right in the photo, all have a rubber man that accounts for four variations. The differences in the four variations are result of having either a Type I or Type II body, or Type 8, 8A, or 9 trucks.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:979
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:979
Year Introduced:1957
This model is an operating caboose, in that the brakeman pops out. The model was produced in 1957 in only one variation. Like the #935, the catalog illustration shows the car with white lettering when in fact the lettering and grab irons are yellow. The rubber brakeman on the rear of the caboose is the same one used on late #977 and #25031 center cupola operating cabooses.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24603
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24603
Year Introduced:1957
The #24603 was illustrated in both the 1957 and 1958 catalogs. The #24603 was only produced in 1958 as very few cars were actually produced with a 5-digit number on the car in 1957. The #24603 has two variations as shown in the photos. One has solid non-operating knuckle couplers while the second has standard operating knuckle couplers.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24610
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24610
Year Introduced:1958
Non-lighted. The model shown in the photo has solid non-operating knuckle couplers and typically came with the 1958 #21161 Simmons Display Train set that has two #24420 Simmons Reefers that have solid non-operating couplers.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24619
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24619
Year Introduced:1958
This model was produced in 1958 with only one variation. It is the same as the #935 except with the new 5-digit number that was introduced in 1957, and started to appear on rolling stock in 1958.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24626
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24626
Year Introduced:1958
The #24626 was produced in 1958 in three variations. The first variation is shown in the photo which has a red-orange stripe, grab irons, and no window coverings. The second is identical except it has window coverings. The third has maroon stripe and grab irons.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24627
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24627
Year Introduced:1959
The bobtail #24627 was produced in 1959 and 1960 in two variations. The first variation, shown in the photo, has a red unpainted plastic body. The second variation is painted red over a red plastic body.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24630
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24630
Year Introduced:1960
Bob-tail caboose. The model in the photo has solid non-operating knuckle couplers. Because Gilbert offered the car in 1961 in uncataloged sets, it did not come with Pike-Master couplers and trucks like many other cataloged 1961 cars.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24631
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24631
Year Introduced:1959
The #24631 was produced twice. The first time was from 1959 through 1961 in three variations. The second time from 1963 through 1965 in four variations. In the front row of the main photo are examples of two of the three 1959-61 cabooses with knuckle couplers. On the left is the first variation, which has flat yellow finish, red-orange stripe, and grabs irons. The second variation on the right is similar to the first except it is a bobtail style caboose meaning it has just one coupler (see Photo #2 for the underside view which shows this clearly). The third variation of the 1959-61 group has a shiny yellow finish with red-orange stripe and grabs irons instead of the red-orange as on the two previous cabooses. In the back row of the main photo are two examples of the four variations of the 1963-65 Pike-Master #24631 cabooses. On the left is the first variation, which has red-orange strip and grab irons. The second variation, shown in the back row on the right, while it has grab irons they are not painted and the caboose also lacks the red-orange stripe. The third and fourth variation both have maroon painted grab irons and stripes. The third variation has both of the top steps on one end filled in (The step being filled in is a result of an older mold). The fourth variation does not have the steps filled in.
Photo
Photo #2
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24632
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24632
Year Introduced:1959
The #24632 was produced in 1959 and has only one reported variation. The 24632 was produced as a bobtail style of caboose.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24633
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24633
Year Introduced:1959
This model was produced from 1959 through 1962, in three variations. The common 1959-60 variation is lighted with knuckle couplers and has "Radio Equipped" posted on the side. The second #24633 with knuckle couplers has no lettering or numbers printed on the car, which was the result of a factory error. The last variation, shown in the photo, was produced in 1961-62 has the Pike-Master trucks and couplers.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24634
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24634
Year Introduced:1963
This model was produced from 1963 through 66, in five red variations. Two are painted red over a black plastic shell; one is red painted over a red shell (as shown in the rear of the photo; one variation was lettered, while the other, front of the photo, wasn't); the fourth is unpainted red plastic; the fifth variation is a non-lighted model without window coverings and all plastic wheels.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24636
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24636
Year Introduced:1961
The #24636 was produced from 1961 through 1966 in 14 variations. The 14 variations all exist within six major groupings, four of which the caboose is unpainted red plastic while the two remaining groups have painted cabooses. The first grouping has lettering on the cabooses that is 1/8" high. The group has four variations, the main differences with the cabooses in this group have to do with the steps being filled in or not. In Photo #3, the caboose in the front row is an example of one of the four variations. The second major grouping has one variation with lettering that is 5/32" high. The third grouping, which has two variations, has lettering that is 3/16" high. The difference in the two variations within this group is that one is marked "RADIO EQUIPPED" while the second is not so marked. Both of the variations are shown in the back row of Photo #3. The fourth major grouping has three variations. All of the cabooses in this group have lettering that is 7/32" high. The first variation in this group the caboose is marked "RADIO EQUIPPED", while the second and third variation within this group are not so marked. The differences in these two is that the "M" in the word "AMERICAN" on one of the variations is pointed on top while the "M" on the other variation is flat-topped. See the two cabooses in the back row of Photo #3 as an example of the two different styles of the letter "M". The two remaining grouping are #24636 AFL cabooses which are painted. The source of red painted caboose is uncertain (see the main photo); some experts believe they came from the 20811 set. In the declining years, which started as early as 1961, Gilbert would paint cars to cover up defects in the cars, as the molds grew older. Photo #2 is of the yellow caboose, which was uncataloged. Its exact source is also unknown. It has been reported as being part of some of the 1966 20811 "The Pioneer" 600 sets. The first grouping is of the red painted #24636 that has one variation. The second grouping, which consisted on yellow painted #24636, has three variations. The three variations are a result of the number of steps that are filled in.
Photo
Photo #2
Photo #3
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:24638
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:24638
Year Introduced:1962
This caboose was produced as an uncataloged item in 1962, in two variations. The first variation, shown in the photo, has two tabs to secure the frame to the body, while the second has four tabs to secure the frame.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:25031
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:25031
Year Introduced:1958
This action caboose is one of the rarest of all post-war cabooses. The reason being that it was not sold separately even though it was listed in the 1958 catalog. In 1958 Gilbert had an abundance of 977 cabooses and sold them in sets and as separate sale items. The only know source for the 25031 Action Caboose was part a very limited number of 1958 Meteor sets as reported by Dennis Bagby in Greenberg's Guide to American Flyer S Gauge Volume III Sets, First Edition. The 1958 set with an action caboose was advertised as having 25031, however, nearly all sets contained the 977 caboose.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler
Manufacturer:American Flyer
Manufacturer ID:25052
Category:Cabooses
Road Name:American Flyer Lines
Road Number:25052
Year Introduced:1958
This model is an operating caboose, in that the brakeman pops out. It was produced in 1958 in three variations. One variation, shown in the photo, has "type 9" trucks while the second has one "type 9" and one "type 10" truck. The last variation is a bit odd in that it actually is a non-operating, non-illuminated caboose with plastic wheels and Pike-Master trucks.
Photo
model owned by Ted Hamler
photo © Ted Hamler

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